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Things to know about cyberbullying

September 18, 2019 by Glain max  

 

Cyberbullying is harassment or intimidation on the internet. It can occur through an email, in a game, text message, or on a social networking site. This practice could involve circulating rumors or images uploaded to someone's profile or circulated for others to see or creating a group or page to exclude a person.

Help prevent cyberbullying:

Talk to your children about bullying:

Tell your children that they cannot hide behind the words they write or the images they spread. Cyberbullying or harassment is a situation in which everyone loses. The hurtful messages not only make the recipient feel bad but also give a bad impression about who sends them. It can often lead to contempt of punishment and peers of the authorities.

Ask your children to tell you if they see an image or message that circulates online that makes them feel threatened or offended. If you fear for the safety of your child, contact the police.

Read the comments. Frequently, cyber bullying involves evil and harmful comments. From time to time, check your child's page to see what he is up to.

Recognize the signs of a cyberbully:

If you want bullying prevention, recognize the signs of a cyberbully. 

Is your child suffering from cyberbullying, look for signs of intimidating behavior, for example, see if your child creates evil images of another boy. Keep in mind that you are a model for your child. Children learn from the rumors that adults spread and other behaviors.

Help stop cyberbullying:

Most boys do not act like bullies or intimidate others, and there is no reason to tolerate it. If your child sees that someone is a victim of cyberbullying, encourage him to try to stop him by telling the bully to stop doing so and avoiding committing or circulating threats. 

What to do before a stalker?

Do not react to the provocations of the stalker or bully:

If your child is the target of a bully, keep calm. Tell your child that most people think bullying is wrong. Tell your child not to react in the same way. Instead, help your child save the evidence and encourage her to talk with you about it. If acts of intimidation persist, show the evidence to the school authorities or local law enforcement.

Protect your child's profile:

If your child finds a profile altered or created without their permission, contact the company that operates the site to remove it.

Block or eliminate cyberbully:

If the bullying involves chat sexting or another online service that requires the user to create a list of "friends", remove the name of the stalker from the lists or block your username or email address.