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Scriptwriter: Their Job and Journey

December 6, 2019 by ScriptStories  

Hey friends, are you interested in reading stories and novels??? Do you love watching movies based on a thrilling story?? Do you also want to be a creativescreenplay writer or looking for ascriptwriter? Then all you need to know about a scriptwriter and how can you look for a goodtelevision writer.

At first, we will discuss the scriptwriter.

So,

What is a scriptwriter?

A scriptwriter or aTV writer is a writer who writes screenplay stories for television, movies and any kind of comics, they are good at writing and their creativity level is beyond your thinking.

If you are looking for a scriptwriter for abook review, then in this article, I am going to tell you about some of the necessary things and qualities that a good scriptwriter should have.

These are something that you should look at while searching for a scriptwriter.

1. Great ability and writing skills

The main thing a good scriptwriter should have a writing potential in yourself andscreenplay rewrite, if he is able to write about your given subject and can expand it as well then this is the right scriptwriter you are looking for because successful writers have great writing ability and they understand very well while writing any script, how and when to create a drama so that thescreenplay review be more interesting.

2. The mind should be creative.

Having good writing skills only may not help you to find a good writer along this skill a good scriptwriter should also have a creative mind, he must have the ability to make a script more interesting with the help of his creative mind, creativity also helps you to make a story good, long and full of enjoyment. You will not able to find too many successful scriptwriters without having a creative mind.

3. Hard-working ability.

If the scriptwriter you are looking for a renowned writer and he has too many projects and scripts to write within a very short interval of time like he is working for any projects and he gets another project at the same time and he has been told to complete both in a few days, even though their stories and scripts are different but he has this capability if working hard to write and write well indeed then has the ability to deliver his best at that required time and he won't get panic under pressure, this will be a good find for you.

4. Well disciplined

As we all know, discipline is very important wherever you go , whatever you do so in this case also discipline make a huge impact in finding the right scriptwriter for you , he has to be quite disciplined in writing on a regular basis, because some days will also come and go when he won't get anything to write on but then only his discipline will say whether he is going to make your project successful or not.

5. Passionate about his career.

Finding a good scriptwriter without passion is not going to take your project too far and it will fall soon, so if you want to make a good project you have to find a good scriptwriters who are passionate towards his career, because this field is for the passionate holder only, this will help you a lot in building your career.

Journey to be a successful writer

If you want to edge your career as a screenplay writer and want to be professional in it then you must have these abilities as written below.

1. Ability to write creatively

Write every single day. Even if some days you are not getting the result useable at all, if you do so you are developing writing habitual. Keep yourself active by joining some writing groups. Write in Pomodoro style to break you’re writing sessions into smaller parts with some breaks such as write for 25 minutes, take a five or ten minutes break then again write for another 25 minutes and continue this process regularly.

2. Ability of Imagination

Give direction to your writing skill in constructing interesting characters and storylines. Writing is not all about typing on a blank page. It's all about teaching the audience about a character and making that audience relate to that particular character. Every story has a beginning, middle phase, and ending, you have to learn to construct each of these parts to the best of your ability.

3. Sharp your skill by reading books

Reading is always useful whether you are preparing for any exams or to be a professional screenwriter. Have a look at some industry magazines to see the top recommendation and to get knowledge, you can also borrow books from any local library or buy them from bookstores. 

4. Take writing classes to sharpen writing ability

Taking one or two classes will help you a lot to sharpen your screenwriting skills. Even if you are already a master in this standard format, you’ll get good knowledge to focus heavily on making your script as good as it is possible. If you have this kind of ability, take classes at any film school or in any theatre company. There, you will be able to create some good screenplays with the help of professional writers.

5. Watch movies

Scripts are always different from novels and academic writing. Watching more and more movies will help you too much to learn how screenwriters manage the story and the play of the film. Because as you can see every single movie has its own story, so if you watch varieties of a movie then it will be very beneficial for you to gain knowledge.

After getting a good knowledge about a screenwriter, their jobs and qualities you need to be professional in this field.

About the Author

General Background

Professional Screenwriter since 1995. Professional Screenplay Ghostwriter since 2007. Experienced in Comedy, Family, Adventure, Suspense, Drama and Spiritual films. Specialize in Story and Character Development for feature film screenplays and new TV Series.

Suzanne has written over fifty screenplays, including scripts that have been optioned, produced and/or in development. She has previously lived in Los Angeles and New York City and is currently residing in the Boston area where she is originally from. She offers screenplay ghostwriting and TV writing services to a vast array of clients, including helping clients to write and develop new screenplays and TV shows.

Education

Columbia University, Graduate School of Arts, NYC Film Division – MFA in Screenwriting Graduated with Honors (3-year program)

 

Hampshire College, Amherst, MA – BA in Narrative Film, Screenwriting & Playwriting.


How Is Script Writing Done?

December 1, 2019 by ScriptStories  

Every movie or TV series begins with an Idea of TV Writerand Book Editor. Whether it is an original idea or a book, you want to adapt to the screen.


You have an idea. Maybe it’s vague or general, and perhaps you’re not sure if it’s any good – but it’s a beginning.


A screenwriterwrites your idea on a piece of paper or your laptop. It doesn’t matter. No one will see it but you. Jot it down shortly, whatever and however; it comes to mind. No judging. Get it out of your head; it doesn’t need to be more than a few sentences. Write it down and move on to.


Think of your hero in this world. How does he behave? What does he know and what doesn’t he know? What is his past story, what are his wants and needs, and what are the obstacles that stand in his way?


Character is important


You got your world, and now you need characters to roam the world and get in trouble screenplay help. To do that, you need to ask 


● Who is the main character?

● What does the character want?

● What prevents her from getting it?


The answers to these questions form a compass. They will guide you on how to build the plot and what obstacles to put in your character’s way. Another benefit of answering these questions is you’ll know what choices and decisions your style will make when facing a dilemma. These answers will change more than once during the work on the script, and that’s fine. It’s more than beautiful; it’s the way it should be.


Even if ascreenplay writer writes a TV series or a movie that has more than one main character (which happens, especially on TV), I suggest that at this stage of the process, you focus on one aspect. After you’ve defined who the main character is and what she wants and why she has trouble getting it, repeat the process for the other characters as well. Or at least for another 3-4 aspects.


Pre Writing


Perform the Pre-write treaty, and you will conserve your time and fill less dishearten. Therefore, you will have a better chance of not quitting and finishing your script. That is how important this step is, and that is why I made you an exclusive freebie –“From idea to structure“.


It’s a 5-day mini-course, in which you’ll learn how to:


● Identify and design your main character.

● Build the main conflict.

● Structure of the main story points.

● It is a simple and efficient process to start a new project. It’s a process I have successfully used and taught for many years.


Building of Words


The world-building is especially crucial for a scriptwriterto write for films and TV series that take place in worlds that are different from ours (such as a Game of Thrones, The Handmaid’s Tale, etc.).


The world-building is an easy and fun process, so take as much time as you want and have fun with it. Formulate some actual impression and imaginativeness into designing your world, and I assure you, your script will benefit from it.


How is word building done?


Imagine a world in which you want your story to take place.

Picture it as vividly and with as many details as you can.


For example, what kind of technology is available in your world? Is it more advanced than our technology? How do people communicate with each other? Phone? Letters? Crows? Telepathy?


How are nature and the climate there? And how does that affect the politics, economics, and architecture?


Is it a religious place? If so, what religion? Is it a theology we understand or a ritual you established?


What is the history of the world? Clothes? Food? Anything you can think of.


Writing


Synopsis.


A Synopsis is the essence of the story, told in the order the audience would be watching it.


The overview should have all the crucial conspiracy points.


● Beginning – Everything from the moment the film/episode starts and up to the inciting incident.

● It is an inciting incident – An event that sets the story in motion. The inciting episode HAS to have a significant effect on the hero.

● First turning point – The hero starts the journey and deals with the new situation caused by the inciting incident.

● Call to action – The hero’s goal gets more specific.

● Point of no return – At the midpoint of the story, the hero will have to risk everything.

● All is lost – Complications and great danger. The hero will have to rise to the occasion and find new inner strength.

● Second turning point – Change in direction. Stakes are higher. The hero has one last shot at redemption.

● Climax – The goal is met; the problem is resolved actively by the hero. The fighter achieves or ceases to function irreversibly. (In a TV episode, that may not be the case).

● The end – The film/episode ends.


Dialogue


Good dialogue, in my opinion, is a dialogue that sounds authentic for the world and the character.


Tips for writing good dialogue:


● Choose a uniqueness to each character. Be subtle.

● Say the dialogue aloud. Hear if it sounds natural. If it doesn’t, change it.

● If you feel you’ve heard it before, take it out. Check this list of the most overused sentences in films. It’s hilarious and a right wake-up call to all screenwriters.

● DON’T let the character say the subtext – the subtext is the true meaning of what we say. In real life, people usually do not say what they want to speak directly.

● Most times, the first draft is full of subtext, and you can quickly fix it in later drafts.

About the Author


General Background


Professional Screenwriter since 1995. Professional Screenplay Ghostwriter since 2007. Experienced in Comedy, Family, Adventure, Suspense, Drama and Spiritual films. Specialize in Story and Character Development for feature film screenplays and new TV Series.


Suzanne has written over fifty screenplays, including scripts that have been optioned, produced and/or in development. She has previously lived in Los Angeles and New York City and is currently residing in the Boston area where she is originally from. She offers screenplay ghostwriting and TV writing services to a vast array of clients, including helping clients to write and develop new screenplays and TV shows.


Education


Columbia University, Graduate School of Arts, NYC Film Division – MFA in Screenwriting Graduated with Honors (3-year program)

 

Hampshire College, Amherst, MA – BA in Narrative Film, Screenwriting & Playwriting.


Screenplay Writer

November 21, 2019 by ScriptStories  

As you most of you already know, Hollywood has stringent standards when it comes to scriptwriting. But where do these strict standards come from? They come from tested genres, which are easily marketed to a broad audience and have a proven track record for success. These screenwriters are carefully crafted to entertain and keep an audience fully engaged from start to finish and are why so many producers use them. Producers will not be interested in most screenplay writers who do not know this craft and who work outside the mainstream because it is taking a big chance. And risk means money. It is also harder to market a film that doesn’t meet these standards and target the right ‘audience’ which makes them less likely to reach the box office. Let a professional screenwriter with years of experience can screenplay help guide you through the scriptwriting process, so your project gets the attention it deserves.

 

Start by selecting a professionally educated and trained screenwriter who has been trained at one of the top film schools in the country. Columbia University Graduate School of Arts, Film Program is known for producing some of the best screenplay ghostwriters in the country for many years. This is an intensive three-year program, where other schools offer only one year of education in scriptwriting. Also, many who graduate from Columbia University Film School go on to teach screenwriting at the top graduate's film schools in the country. So that’s a good start. But I am also something that few other professional screenwriters for hire are. I am a speedy writer! Whereas other professional screenwriters can take up to a year to complete a single screenplay or TV Script pilot, I can develop written and polished new Screenplay development and TV Series within a few months.

 

Many writers ignore taking the time to get to know their characters intimately. For styles to stand out, you need to do an in-depth character background, on each character, so you know them inside and out, including their detailed knowledge, flaws, and strengths.

 

Know your character’s morals, upbringing, and education and ‘core’ values are essential to writing their dialogue and reactions. You don’t need to worry if these details make to the scene and page, but as a screenwriter required, you do need to know who they are and how they would ‘react’ in most situations. The most crucial element is to include the character ‘flaws’ which makes them stand out ‘emotionally’ to the audience. Once they get what’s troubling them and can relate and start to route for them, it is always the ‘human flaw’ that the audience remembers the most about the characters. And how they overcome those ‘flaws’ in the end.

 

Stage 1

 

The Stage of Story and Character Development

 

The essential part of any new screenplay project is the story and character development stage. This ‘critical’ step ensures you have the entire ‘key’ storytelling eliminates in place before the writing begins — and therefore saves you the time and cost consumed in rewrites. It is an essential part of the scriptwriter process and is not to be taken lightly or overlooked. All the decisions are made between the client, and the screenwriter is agreed upon during the ten-phone conference call period (one hour each) and is outlined for the client’s approval and review before the first draft is written. It is up to the screenwriter to educate the client during the story and character development process as to what these ‘key’ elements are and why they are needed in ever-professional screenwriters scripts. It is a valuable lesson that all clients learn and take with them to future projects.

 

Stage 2

 

First Draft of the Screenplay

 

Only once the story and character development phase are completed, it is time for the professional screenwriter to write the first draft of the screenplay. Every important ‘key’ component is already discussed and decided upon by both the screenwriter and the client and is highlighted in the 20-25 scene breakdown of the screenplay outline. Once the first draft is completed (110-120 pages) written in Final Draft Software, the professional scriptwriter software used by most professional screenwriters, it will be delivered back to the client for their review in a PDF File. Both the screenwriter and the customer then examine the script furthermore, and the first draft then enters the final stage of the screenwriting process, which is the Final Polish.

 

Stage 3

 

Giving a Final Polish to the Screenplay

 

The Final Screenplay Polish stage is meant to take a first draft of the screenplay and turn it into an entirely ‘polished’ product ready for producers and readers to review. The script polish phase puts up with all that is working eliminates any ‘fat’ (something that slows the reader down) and further strengthens and highlights the exciting areas of the script that make it a ‘quick read’ and more enticing to both readers and producers. This includes tightening scenes and action sequences and focusing on improving the dialogue between the primary and secondary characters. The polish is the final stage in turning the screenwriting project into a professional script ready to be reviewed by industry professionals as well as marketed and sold.

 

Conclusion:

 

Completed the THREE STAGES of the screenwriting process guarantees that your project will achieve its fullest potential. It assures that your article is willing to exhibit to producers and business experts alike and will come back with either a ‘consider or recommended’ after it has been reviewed. 

 

Going through the entire THREE STAGES of the screenwriting process also gives the client more confidence that their project will meet the strict standards of the film industry and the demands of the current marketplace. There is no better feeling for the client to be sure that their writing project has been successfully transformed into a viable script; they can be proud to share with others and call their own. This is what you get when you hire the right professional screenwriter and TV Script Writer who will give your project the time, talent and attention it deserves to succeed in the marketplace. See client testimonials for more details.


About Author:

 General Background

 Professional Screenwriter since 1995.  Professional Screenplay Ghostwriter since 2007. Experienced in Comedy, Family, and Adventure, Suspense, Drama and Spiritual films.  Specialize in Story and Character Development for feature film screenplays and new TV Series.

Suzanne has written over fifty screenplays, including scripts which have been optioned, produced and/or in development.  She has previously lived in Los Angeles and New York City and is currently residing in the Boston area where she is originally from.  She offers screenplay ghostwriting and TV writing services to a vast array of clients, including helping clients to write and develop new screenplays and TV shows.

 Education

 Columbia University, Graduate School of Arts, NYC Film Division – MFA in Screenwriting Graduated with Honors (3-year program)

 

Hampshire College, Amherst, MA – BA in Narrative Film, Screenwriting & Playwriting


Screenwriter

November 12, 2019 by ScriptStories  

The Invisible War

Feature Film – Supernatural Spiritual Suspense Drama

 

Story Development & Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis (Ghostwriter) & Jesse Battle

“The Invisible War is a supernatural spiritual drama that follows the life of a struggling black artist reluctant to believe in God after being abused as a child, who suspects he is being stalked by a threatening woman who possesses a demonic spirit.  Scenes often deliver on this high expectation and highlight the risks to the protagonist who derives tension from these obstacles effectively. Action relates well to the core concept, and the characters have room to be exploring their emotions as well as convey meaningful subtext.  As Jesse is repeated stalked by Simone, who is hell bent on converting him towards occult and Satan, Jesse soon finds himself turning to religion in an effort to get her out of his life. Jesse is further educated in ways of demons by Born Again Christian, Angela, who works with Jesse at a hotel and who offers Jesse advise on how to deal with them through Bible teachings about ‘Spiritual Warfare’.  Through a series of compelling encounters with Simone and her ‘fellow’ demons, Jesse soon discovers his true ‘gift’ of discern ‘demonic spirits’ living inside human beings — a gift he possessed as a child but has since forgotten. This ‘gift’ also proves to provide another spiritual awakens when a message is relayed to him from God that he has been chosen as the ‘Last Prophet’ to rid New York City of its demonic presence.  As Jesse struggles to deal with this revelation he turns towards Christianity itself to bind the evil sprits around him. As the battle escalates between Simone, and her fellow Satan/occult worshiping roommate, Caesar, Jesse is lured into a den of evil in a tent located at the Brooklyn Trinidad Street Carnival where attendees offer human sacrifices to Satan. Here Jesse confronts all the demons, including the Satan himself, in a climactic scene, which proves to be both realistic and breathtaking.  This script deserves high marks. Great writing!”

RECOMMEND – Reader from Specscout.com

Sunnycrest Farm for Boys

One-Hour TV Series – Family Period Drama (1960s)

TV Series Development, First Episode & Treatment by Suzanne Gillis (Ghostwriter) & Michael Jackson

“There is solid potential in for this TV Series premise, particularly in the nostalgic feel and the transition 12 year-old Michael makes from a dangerous urban area environment to the pleasant life on a rural farm. The contrast between life in the North Philly projects, complete with broken elevators and aggressive gang members recruiting young kids, to life in Quaker/Amish Lancaster County – with swimming/fishing holes and feeding livestock – is quite effective. The meeting between Big Momma and Miss Stuckland effectively sets up the action and change of location that follows.  Once Michael arrives at the farm, the writer does a solid job drawing him out of his shell and showing him form friendships with the other orphaned, neglected and abused boys. The bonds are formed and the storyline is engaging at all times. The strong characters who encounter bullies, negro girls at a neighboring farm for girls who they engage with through weekly dances, as well as the many other adventures highlighted in the additional episodes, makes this TV Series stand out and highly unique.”

Reader NSP – ScreenplayCoverage.com

Sunnycrest Farm for Boys

One-Hour TV Series – Family Period Drama (1960s)

TV Series Development, First Episode & Treatment by Suzanne Gillis (Ghostwriter) & Michael Jackson

“SFFB’s main characters are charming. A young boy from the projects of Northern “Philadelphia is lucky to have a grandmother, Big Momma, so determined to protect him from gangs that she talks her grandson’s way into a three-year program with the Quakers that teaches academics and farming life far away from the inner city projects. The writer shows a strong ability in good storyteller, as Michael’s journey to Sunnycrest Farm is both touching and engaging.  You have set up a family that you can really root for – which viewers will want to tune in to find out what happens to the family and to Michael on a weekly basis. There is a Family Television feel to your script as well as a unique and lively family that we can really care about root for right away. Despite the danger lurking in the Projects, your script has a very warm and hopeful feel to it, which a viewer can easily share with his whole family. There is no visual violence from the gangs in North Philly, but only sounds and threats made, which makes Michael’s stay at Sunnycrest seems like a bucolic, adventurous journey full of boyish scuffles and challenges free from violence.  Since this is also autobiographical, we eagerly anticipating Michaels ‘weekly’ adventures. The strength of a family is a good theme — especially the strength of the women – Big Momma, Van, and Miss Stuckland. Michael having doubts about leaving his family to take advantage of Sunnycrest is every child’s experience on leaving home for the first time. The importance of having good friends around him is also a theme for Michael – as well as sharing his family with his newfound ‘orphaned buddies’ who never grew up with families of their own or the experience ‘loving relatives.’ The overall tone of your TV Series is youthful and one of discovery. This could be a great TV show for the entire family.”

Reader SLT – ScreenplayCoverage.com

Sunnycrest Farm for Boys

One-Hour TV Series – Family Period Drama (1960s) 

TV Series Development, First Episode & Treatment by Suzanne Gillis (Ghostwriter) & Michael Jackson

“The drama centers on the journey of a young boy, who struggles with the joys and the heartbreak of growing up in the 1960s in the North Philadelphia Projects and at Sunnycrest Farm for boys. The time-period and culture feel authentic and the tone is consistently dramatic. The pilot offers a cast of likable and charming characters driven by the emotional goals and struggles.  The opening is strong and easily pulls the audience into the pilot as well as nicely sets the tone as well as firmly establishes the culture and time-period. The image of opening with JFK speaking in the North Philly projects to a mostly Negro crowd is smart. The main characters opening voice-over is also sharp as it introduces the audience to Michael’s ordinary world. The idea of Michael attending Sunnycrest Farm is the pivotal event that changes Michael’s life forever.  The rest of the pilot is driven by Michael’s struggle to adjust to his new world full of farm life, Quaker values, the surrounding Amish community and the orphan boys, some of who becomes his most ‘trusted’ friends against the many orphaned and abused bullies.” 

 

Reader TZ – Screenplayreaders.com

Bon Appetite'

Half-Hour TV Series – Live Action-Animation for Pre-Teens

TV Series Development, First Episode & Treatment by Suzanne Gillis (Ghostwriter) & Lennox Blackwood

“Thank you, Suzanne, for all your talent in helping me develop this pre-teen animated and live action TV series kids show.  Your contribution to the characters and story was extremely appreciated as well as your attention to many fine details. You somehow took my strange animated ‘cooking utensil’ characters and brought them to life — giving them each very distinct voices with personalities, which exceeded my expectations. They are now equal to many famous animation TV shows and movies of our times and completely unforgettable. I also enjoyed the process of working with you, which helped me to better understand the entire TV SHOW development process.  It allowed me to walk away with the TV script that I truly love as well as an incredible first episode. I am grateful to you for all your hard work and additional help after the project was finished. Your suggestions on how to prepare material for marketing were extremely helpful. Can’t wait to use you again on more future projects!”

 

Lennox Blackwood, Client, Creator and Writer – London, UK

The General's Wife

Feature Film – Period WWII Suspense Thriller Drama (1940s)   

Story Development & Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis & Charles Gibbs

“This WWII drama has a compelling premise — a high-ranking Nazi General is married to an American wife who is secretly working with the Allies, and their teenage son who is torn between his parents.  The concept provides lots of narrative tension and forces you to care deeply about Kurt’s untenable position trapped between his feelings for both parents whom he deeply loves. I also enjoyed the similarity to Alfred Hitchcock’s NOTORIOUS, in which Nazi Claude Rains discovers he is married to an American spy played by Ingrid Bergman and the tension of how it played out once she entered his house. The dialogue has a formal quality to it, which is appropriate to Europe in WWII. “I have no intentions of abandoning my wife now, or in the future. Nor do I feel my son would approve of such an arrangement.” None of the dialogue jarred me out of the time and place of the story, and in my experience is a rare achievement. The complicated climax was well choreographed; with the writer deftly keep track of the movements of over a dozen characters. Well done!”

 

Reader 8204 – The Blue Cat Screenplay Contest

The General's Wife

Feature Film – Period WWII Suspense Thriller Drama (1940s)

Story Development & Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis & Charles Gibb

“Gripping and intense in a number of respects, this script begins with an innately high-stakes scenario and builds upon it a storyline that remains energetic and fairly harrowing throughout its duration. The opening immediately establishes the tone and historical backdrop of the story, following Nancy as she is exiled and Kurt begins growing up without her. As she attempts to reach out to him, first pulling Kurt into a more rebellious mindset, the story advances toward its second act, following both of them to a surprising turning point as Albert essentially decides to join their cause.  At every turn, it feels as if Kurt, Nancy, and even Albert are risking their lives in the name of completing increasingly valiant deeds, and this sense of imminent repercussions creates a natural investment in their actions. Some solid character beats, funneling toward a conclusion that seems fast-paced and action-packed; this script deserves credit for rendering a narrative with some intrinsic, gripping appeal, and a broader presentation that comes across as entertaining throughout its duration.”

Scriptshark.com – Reader EK – CONSIDER

The General's Wife

Feature Film – Period WWII Suspense Thriller Drama (1940s)

Story Development & Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis & Charles Gibb

“THE GENERAL’S WIFE has an intriguing, evocative premise that remarkably hasn’t been done before to this reader’s knowledge, despite the plethora of films about World War II.  It’s got a universally understandable dilemma for all three lead characters – Albert, a Nazi, his wife Nancy who works for the Allied forces in secret, and Kurt their son, who is stuck in between his two parents and pulled in both directions. The script structures itself around this setup smartly, with Albert’s turn not coming until midway through the story, at which point the family is united in purpose against the Nazis, culminating in a climactic wedding sequence that is rich with tension.”

 

Specscout.com Reader

The General's Wife

Feature Film – Period WWII Suspense Thriller Drama (1940s)

Story Development & Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis & Charles Gibb

“Utilizing a fascinating concept within a proven genre, THE GENERAL’S WIFE unfolds a sweeping insight into a family torn apart and ultimately finding redemption within humanity’s most brutal setting. Within this rich tableau, the screenplay conjures fascinating character dynamics, reveals unique perspectives, and weaves these elements into an engrossing, entertaining, and fiercely cinematic screenplay.  It is abundantly clear that THE GENERAL’S WIFE is a great screenplay with a solid structure and the writers’ outstanding prowess is evident throughout.”

 

Scriptshark.com – Reader GM

The King's Rook

Feature Film – Sci-Fi Action Thriller

Story Development & Rewrite by Suzanne Gillis

“Thank you so much for all your hard work in this difficult rewrite.  You addressed all our main concerns as well as fixed all the character issues which were holding back the story and did it all in record time to meet our shooting deadline.  Your suggestions and insight were dead on and exactly what we needed and helped to make this a much stronger script from start to finish. We will certainly be looking forward to working with you again on other future projects.”

STELLAR FILMS – PRODUCERS Liv Zheng & Zane Thomas

The Naughty Boy

Feature Film – Holiday Family Fantasy Adventure

Story Development & Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis & Kyle Watson

“This has great potential as a movie about a boy who decides to reclaim the true spirit of Christmas and remind people what the holidays are all about – family.  It’s a great theme and sadly often overlooked during the holidays. These days, Christmas seems to have become all about the presents. I like that the writers are able to take the story to the extreme point of James stealing presents in an attempt to make parents and kids realize that they need to communicate better. The parents realize that they’ve been interfering with Santa by buying presents for their kids.  That’s all great and really hits the theme.”

 

Scriptshark.com – Reader EK

The Naughty Boy

Feature Film – Holiday Family Fantasy Adventure   

Story Development & Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis & Kyle Watson​

“Suzanne, I wanted to say that I believe in you. You are an extremely talented writer and are always in tune with every aspect of this screenplay project, even aspects that often elude me. This script is already incredible and I believe that a lot of that is purely you. You probably already know that, but I felt compelled to say it now so maybe there is a reason for it. I look forward to seeing the final draft and getting this project into the movie theaters very soon.”

 

Client, Co-Writer & Co-Developer – Kyle Watson

The Naughty Boy

Feature Film – Holiday Family Fantasy Adventure

Story Development & Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis & Kyle Watson​

“A fun holiday family film with enough whimsy and wit to appeal to both children and adults, THE NAUGHTY BOY creates a vivid fantasy world but populates it with believable, complex characters. James is a wonderful protagonist, and his growth from insensitive lout into a caring person is affecting because he is such a nuanced character, with complicated emotions just like a child in his situation would be. The other characters are likewise immediate and emotionally real, so the dramatic stakes of the story always feel important. THE NAUGHTY BOY has a number of great ideas percolating through it, and is packed with wonderful characters.”

John Papapvolos, Gallagher Literary Agency – RECOMMEND

My Grey Alien

Feature Film – Musical Sci-Fi Romance

Story Development & Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis (Ghostwriter) & Jeffrey West

“First of all, I want to say how much FUN I’m having with this project.  It has been an extraordinary experience for me and it’s just the beginning. I feel CONNECTED and ENGAGED in the creative process again and I’m LOVIN’ it!  I have no idea how you did it, but you took my crazy idea about a Musical love story with an AWOL Alien who sings lead in a Country Western band and falls in love with a female SINGER — beyond what I had ever imagined.  The characters are incredible now! Thank you! You really ramped it up this fantastical story and made sense of all the crazy elements — including developing an incredible cast of characters — and turned it ALL into an enormously workable and entertaining movie! And as for the MUSIC, you even encouraged me to WRITE TWO NEW songs, which pulled it all together even more, in terms of the emotional elements, needed to round out this incredible CAST of unique characters.  Outstanding JOB!”

Jeffrey West – Client, Co-Writer/Creator & Songwriter – Santa Cruz, CA

Dog Gone Dubie

Feature Film – Comedy Romance Adventure

Story Development & Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis & Craig Frankel​

“Bright, funny, and playfully optimistic in tone, this script begins with a unique concept and builds upon it a touching romantic comedy scenario. Excellent characters, a subtle and elegant overall delivery, and a strong sense of cinematic storytelling further bolster a finished product that feels as if it possesses an innate and natural sense of commercial appeal. In its quirky, offbeat sensibilities, and its distinctive style and written voice, it proves thoroughly entertaining from start to finish.”

CONSIDER – Scriptshark.com – Reader EK

HONORABLE MENTION – The Happy Writer’s Screenplay Contest

Dog Gone Dubie

Feature Film – Comedy Romance Adventure

Story Development & Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis & Craig Frankel

“With her knowledge of screenplays, Suzanne was able to take my story and create a screenplay that has structure, style, and flow. She created the dialogue that helped the characters have an endearing nuance to them. She was able to build character arcs that allow the story to be told in such an engaging way that the personalities of the characters literally jump off the page at you. I highly recommend Suzanne! “

Craig Frankel – Client, Co-Write & Co-Developer

Cupid's Day Off

Feature Film – Holiday Fantasy Adventure Romance

Original Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis

“Suzanne, this was a really cover-to-cover fun read and a story that I believe will find a home. It reminds me a great deal of an old Jack Benny movie, ‘THE HORN BLOWS AT MIDNIGHT’. It is about Ethanial, an angel, sent to blow Gabriel’s horn at midnight, thus ending the world. Naturally, he fails and it is a hilarious look at the fish-out-of-water among humans in New York City. It also reminded me a bit of MICHAEL, but the more innocent side.”

Joseph Pillitteri – ProfessionalScreenwriter

Mr. Anonymous

Feature Film – Romance Comedy 

Original Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis

“Big Plusses! This is a romantic comedy that has a very clear, original, highly clever premise. You know how to create believable characters and walk them through very funny situations. The script has a definite appeal over and above the average romantic comedy because of the mortician and sperm donor angle. This is a topic not many dare to tackle. Great job!”

CANE 49 –Screenwriter & Mentor

Mr. Anonymous

Feature Film – Romance Comedy

Original Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis

“Every once in a while a script comes along that is fresh, original, and just a lot of fun to read! This was that script. I loved the characters and the funny aspect of the story had just enough seriousness to not be too cheesy. It’s obvious that the writer is experienced as this was a breeze to read. Well done!”

Joseph Pillitteri – ProfessionalScreenwriter

The Mother Load

Feature Film – Family Romance Comedy  

Original Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis

“First off, I really enjoyed ‘The Mother Load.’ It was indeed one of the most entertaining scripts I’ve read in a long while. The prize of the script is the characterizations. Especially the quirkiest characters like Marion, the mother, who manages to keep the story flowing rather nicely along. The characterizations are almost good enough to sell the story on their own.”

Alfredo Fortuna – ProfessionalScreenwriter

Undatable You

Feature Film – Romance Comedy  

Original Screenplay by Suzanne Gillis ​​

“Wow, Suzanne, this is a terrific screenplay and the best I’ve read on this Web site. I can understand why producers are interested in reading it. You take a run-of-the-mill romantic comedy and deviate from its standard procedure producing an entertaining and lovable script. You really describe your characters accurately and paint an excellent picture of them in the reader’s mind. Great premise, great chemistry, and a great plot. Congratulations!”

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